1. 29th Oct 2013

    Notes: 16

    "There was a wonderful sense of revolution and innovation in the studio in Queens."—Gloria Swanson, on the Astoria studio, subject of a new exhibition now on view at Museum of the Moving Image
Swanson is seen here in her backstage “bungalow” during production of The Humming Bird (1924) with director Sidney Olcott (standing) and co-star Edward Burns (in uniform). 

    "There was a wonderful sense of revolution and innovation in the studio in Queens."—Gloria Swanson, on the Astoria studio, subject of a new exhibition now on view at Museum of the Moving Image

    Swanson is seen here in her backstage “bungalow” during production of The Humming Bird (1924) with director Sidney Olcott (standing) and co-star Edward Burns (in uniform). 

     
  2. 22nd Sep 2013

    Notes: 3

    Photo: John Barrymore and Carole Lombard in Twentieth Century (1934). Courtesy of Sony Repertory.
If film critics Andrew Sarris and Molly Haskell didn’t exist, Howard Hawks would have had to invent them; a garrulous, witty cinephile who became a paragon in his field, a woman who could match him insight for insight, and distinguish herself in an enclosed, nearly all-male world. Chief Curator David Schwartz interviewed them about Hawks in 2008 for Moving Image Source:

[Schwartz] Howard Hawks is a great example of a director who was rescued by film critics. SARRIS: Well, by the French!Could you talk about how that happened? Hawks was successful as a director in Hollywood, but not really known. SARRIS: He was successful, but he wasn’t prestigious. HASKELL: Wasn’t taken seriously. SARRIS: I think he was only nominated for one Oscar, for Sergeant York. And he never won an Oscar, of course. The first time I heard about him was when my friend Eugene Archer, went to Paris in the 1950s on a Fulbright. He wrote me a letter and said, “Who the hell is Howard Hawks?” He had signed a contract for a book that he was going to do about six directors: Elia Kazan, John Ford, George Stevens, and so on. The Cahiers people said, “Ugh! What about Howard Hawks and Hitchcock?”

Read the full conversation here. The Museum’s complete Hawks retrospective continues through November 10.

    Photo: John Barrymore and Carole Lombard in Twentieth Century (1934). Courtesy of Sony Repertory.

    If film critics Andrew Sarris and Molly Haskell didn’t exist, Howard Hawks would have had to invent them; a garrulous, witty cinephile who became a paragon in his field, a woman who could match him insight for insight, and distinguish herself in an enclosed, nearly all-male world.

    Chief Curator David Schwartz interviewed them about Hawks in 2008 for Moving Image Source:

    [Schwartz] Howard Hawks is a great example of a director who was rescued by film critics.

    SARRIS: Well, by the French!

    Could you talk about how that happened? Hawks was successful as a director in Hollywood, but not really known.

    SARRIS: He was successful, but he wasn’t prestigious.

    HASKELL: Wasn’t taken seriously.

    SARRIS: I think he was only nominated for one Oscar, for Sergeant York. And he never won an Oscar, of course. The first time I heard about him was when my friend Eugene Archer, went to Paris in the 1950s on a Fulbright. He wrote me a letter and said, “Who the hell is Howard Hawks?” He had signed a contract for a book that he was going to do about six directors: Elia Kazan, John Ford, George Stevens, and so on. The Cahiers people said, “Ugh! What about Howard Hawks and Hitchcock?”

    Read the full conversation here. The Museum’s complete Hawks retrospective continues through November 10.

     
  3. 13th Sep 2013

    Notes: 99

    Louise Brooks and Victor McLaglen in A Girl in Every Port (Howard Hawks, 1928). Showing Sunday, September 13, 2013, 6:00 p.m. with live music by Donald Sosin

    Louise Brooks and Victor McLaglen in A Girl in Every Port (Howard Hawks, 1928). Showing Sunday, September 13, 2013, 6:00 p.m. with live music by Donald Sosin

     
  4. 10th Sep 2013

    Notes: 3

    It’s our birthday!

    image

    On September 10, 1988, Museum of the Moving Image opened its doors to the public. At the time, years before the promise of the Internet and digital media were captured in the now-quaint phrase “Information Superhighway,” the idea of a museum, built on an historic site for movie production, that would take a unified view of the disparate worlds of film, television, and video games, seemed as audacious as it was unprecedented. There was, simply, no museum like it in the world. It was an innovative blend of a science museum, an art museum, a technology museum, and a history museum, with a unique mix of artifacts, commissioned artworks, interactive experiences (at the time employing such now-arcane technology as laserdisc players, slide projectors, and electronic synthesizers), and video clips.

    From its earliest days, the Museum has been committed to being at once forward-looking, reflecting a subject matter that is defined by innovation, and to being rooted in history, always remembering that the latest advances are part of a continuum. Today’s YouTube videos of adorable cats were preceded by short films of boxing cats shown in the 1890s on Thomas Edison’s Kinetoscopes. Today’s big-screen blockbusters have their roots in Edwin S. Porter’s still-thrilling 1903 film The Great Train Robbery.

    Read more from Carl Goodman, the Museum’s Executive Director, on the occasion of our 25th Anniversary.

     
  5. 6th Sep 2013

    Notes: 11

    Reblogged from howardhawkshollywood

    howardhawkshollywood:

    Life Magazine cover story of Oct 16, 1944 for Howard Hawks’ discovery Lauren Bacall and their new film with Humphrey Bogart, To Have and Have Not, premiering Oct 11, 1944.

     
  6. 6th Sep 2013

    Notes: 6

    Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not (1944)”The magnificence of [Lauren Bacall’s] lithe, angular movements, drawling bassoon wisecracks and smoldering, up-from-under glances is in no way diminished by traces of nerves and awkwardness. Instead, the vulnerability under her bravado makes us like her more, and root for her as she carries it off. Bogart’s character, Harry Morgan, may be stand-offish with Bacall’s “Slim,” playing hard to get; but the actor is all generosity as he allows the inexperienced thoroughbred to upstage him. He backs her up with his marvelously precise reactions: little lifts of the eyebrows, widenings of the eyes, and slight smiles, the appreciative warmth banked down behind his weathered deadpan.” Read more from Imogen Sara Smith’s insightful essay on Howard Hawks here.The Museum’s complete Howard Hawks retrospective runs September 7–November 10, 2013.

    Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not (1944)

    The magnificence of [Lauren Bacall’s] lithe, angular movements, drawling bassoon wisecracks and smoldering, up-from-under glances is in no way diminished by traces of nerves and awkwardness. Instead, the vulnerability under her bravado makes us like her more, and root for her as she carries it off. Bogart’s character, Harry Morgan, may be stand-offish with Bacall’s “Slim,” playing hard to get; but the actor is all generosity as he allows the inexperienced thoroughbred to upstage him. He backs her up with his marvelously precise reactions: little lifts of the eyebrows, widenings of the eyes, and slight smiles, the appreciative warmth banked down behind his weathered deadpan.” Read more from Imogen Sara Smith’s insightful essay on Howard Hawks here.

    The Museum’s complete Howard Hawks retrospective runs September 7–November 10, 2013.

     
  7. 4th Sep 2013

    Notes: 237

    Reblogged from undinae

    cesperanza:

    Cut Up: an exhibit at the Museum of the Moving Image, going to Sept 15!  Go see the pretty vids in a museum! :D

    Update: Cut Up has been extended through October 14

     
  8. 3rd Sep 2013

    Notes: 2

    We cannot be happier to see this terrific illustration by Steve Wacksman in The New Yorker which references the Museum’s Breaking Bad exhibit (issue date: September 2, 2013)

    We cannot be happier to see this terrific illustration by Steve Wacksman in The New Yorker which references the Museum’s Breaking Bad exhibit (issue date: September 2, 2013)

     
  9. 15th Aug 2013

    Notes: 8

    Reblogged from ama-true

    ama-true:

Courtyard - Museum of Moving Image - Reflections - Astoria, Queens, NYC

Clean lines on this carnival mirror. Nice shot!

    ama-true:

    Courtyard - Museum of Moving Image - Reflections - Astoria, Queens, NYC

    Clean lines on this carnival mirror. Nice shot!

     
  10. 12th Aug 2013

    Notes: 6

    From “‘Charlie Rose’ by Samuel Beckett” by Andrew Filippone Jr. The full video is on view at Museum of the Moving Image as part of the exhibition Cut Up, which features a selection of supercuts, mashups, remixes, and other short-form video works that take movies, music videos, television series, and news broadcasts as their source material, focusing on genres and techniques that have emerged online over the past decade and their on- and offline precedents. Filippone, Jr. will participate in a discussion with fellow filmmaker Robert Ryang, creator of the infamous “Shining” video, about their work on August 16, 2013, at the Museum, as part of the series Cut Up Sit Downs.

    From “‘Charlie Rose’ by Samuel Beckett” by Andrew Filippone Jr.

    The full video is on view at Museum of the Moving Image as part of the exhibition Cut Up, which features a 
    selection of supercuts, mashups, remixes, and other short-form video works that take movies, music videos, television series, and news broadcasts as their source material, focusing on genres and techniques that have emerged online over the past decade and their on- and offline precedents. Filippone, Jr. will participate in a discussion with fellow filmmaker Robert Ryang, creator of the infamous Shining” video, about their work on August 16, 2013, at the Museum, as part of the series Cut Up Sit Downs.